Microsoft Access basics: How to manage Linked tables

This is the final part of a three-part series of tutorials on Linked Tables in Microsoft Access. If you've missed out on the previous parts, then you may want to take a look: Part one: Why create linked tables in Microsoft Access and then Part two: How to create linked tables in Microsoft Access. In [...]

Microsoft Access basics: How to create Linked tables

This is part two of a three-part series of tutorials on Linked Tables in Microsoft Access. If you've missed out on part one, then you may want to take a look: Why create linked tables in Microsoft Access. In this second part of the tutorial, we're taking a look at the practical nuts and bolts, [...]

Microsoft Access basics: Why create Linked tables?

Linked tables in Microsoft Access Linked tables are strange. Anyone who spends any time developing databases in Microsoft Access will always split their database into a front end and a back end. The front end will contain linked tables which are so called because they are linked to the back end. All this is straightforward. [...]

Microsoft Access basics – tables, forms, queries and reports

This is the first in a series of posts we'll be creating over the coming months about the fundamentals of Microsoft Access. This series has been devised to answer the questions that everyone has when they start using Microsoft Access for creating databases, or when they first begin to use existing Microsoft Access databases. The [...]

A Microsoft Access tool to automatically rename your form controls

I love Microsoft Access. There, I said it. Thare are so many things I love about it that I wouldn't know where to start with listing them all. So, it's just as well that this article isn't about that. It's about fixing one of those things that's just a bit of a pain. Use prefixes [...]

The InputBox Function, the InputBox method, and using strptr

The InputBox is one of the most commonly called functions in the whole of VBA. Whether you're writing a complete database application in Microsoft Access, or just adding bit of functionality to your Microsoft Excel workbooks, the odds are that you won't do much coding before you make your first call to the InputBox function.

So, I thought I'd dedicate this post to getting a little more from the InputBox - particularly in Excel, but also in Access.

Conditional format a Microsoft Access form

Conditional formatting forms in Microsoft Access

Conditional formatting is made easy in Microsoft Access - there's a simple dialog box to complete, and your fields will change colour as soon as your crieteria is met.

But what if you don't want to colour code the text boxes but the entire form? It doesn't appear possibe from the dialog box, but it can be done. In this tutorial we look at two ways of achieving the objective - one using Access VBA and one without.